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I'm a dental hygienist. Can I be an independent contractor?

Let’s get straight to the point. Yes, a dental hygienist can be an independent contractor, but if only he/she appropriately follows the rules.

Pros and cons of being a dental hygienist

Dental hygienists play an indispensable role in every dental practice up and down the country. These integral people are in charge of everything from cleaning patients’ teeth and making nervous people feel more relaxed to taking mouth x-rays and educating patients on at-home dental hygiene. 

RDH? This is why going temp may increase your market value

A career as an RDH (registered dental hygienist) can be extremely rewarding on multiple levels. You get to help patients achieve and maintain a beautiful, healthy smile and you work in a hands-on environment in a way that really lets you make a difference to people’s everyday lives. As a dental hygiene professional, your skills, abilities and knowledge are in high demand in dental practices across the country. 

12 Hilarious struggles you'll only understand if you're a dental hygienist

Working as an RDH (Registered Dental Hygienist) has its positives and negatives. And while the positives are easy to take, it’s really how you deal with the negatives that will determine whether your career in the dental industry will be a success. The best way to deal with bad parts? Look on the funny side!

RDH and want to open your own practice? Stop dreaming and start doing.

The ability to own a dental practice or to provide oral care as an independently practicing hygienist is making headway and becoming a reality in many states. Presently, 40 states have authorized direct access care, up from 28 states in 2008. That’s a good thing for hygienists who aspire to open their own practices. But wait; is going independent or opening a dental practice that easy?  

This is what working as a dental hygienist is like in the US

Being a registered dental hygienist (RDH) in the U.S.A can be a rewarding profession. It’s a field that is known to offer flexibility, prestige, financial security, and high levels of job satisfaction. However, to be allowed to practice as a hygienist in the U.S, you must have graduated from a dental hygiene program and met the qualifications for your respective state-licensure.

Dental professional? This is how to earn more and regain your freedom

A career in dental assisting, dental hygiene or dentistry can be extremely rewarding. You get to help patients regain or maintain their oral health. You get to work in a hands-on setting that really lets you make a difference. As an oral-health helper, you’re always in demand among dental practices. In fact, the field is slated to continue to grow in the coming years. 

What's it really like to work in a dental practice?

Short answer: never a dull moment!

Difference between RDH vs dentist

If you’re already a dental hygienist or a dentist, you may find yourself explaining to your friends, family and patients how one job is different from the other. If you’re considering a career in dentistry, you may not be certain which path to take. There are so many types of  oral health care professionals (dental hygienist, dental assistant, dentist and specialist, to name a few).

5 dental hygienists share stories of their early job adventures

Working as a registered dental hygienist has both its perks and its downsides. They say that once you’ve gone through your RDH program, completed your licensing requirements and registered with a dental association, you’re ready to enter the real world. Of course, that “real world” is full of surprises. Here, five dental hygienists tell us about their adventures in job hunting and working for the first time as fully licensed oral health care professionals.

Why can’t dental hygienists find more flexible jobs?

Work is changing. It’s true for professionals in every sector. Businesses are hiring freelancers and consultants instead of full-time workers. People are leaving corporate jobs and starting their own small businesses. The Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences reports that 60 million Americans will be self-employed by 2020. In every sector, people are offering their talents and skills directly to businesses and individuals.

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